Steven Hu

Steven Hu

Special Counsel

Originally from China, Steven first came to Australia in 1997. He graduated from the University of Queensland and the University of Sydney with Bachelor's degrees in Science and Law. He began his career as an associate to D.F Rofe QC at 12th Floor Wentworth Chambers in 2004 and was admitted to practice as a lawyer in 2007. He worked in a national firm prior to joining Inmark Group, a property development and asset management company, where he worked as an associate director and legal counsel. After successfully managing a large-scale, multi-award-winning mix-use development in the Sydney CBD for Inmark Group, Steven returned to China in 2013 to take on a senior executive position for a Chinese State-Owned Enterprise specialising in city construction. He was responsible for overseeing and managing the day-to-day business for the entity in Shandong Province. Steven returned to Australia in 2017 and continued his career in the legal profession with a better and more in-depth understanding of the corporate culture and practical commercial experience in conducting cross border transactions. Steven’s multi-disciplinary experience will no doubt add value to his advice to Asian corporate clients operating in Australia. Steven is fluent in English and Mandarin.

Expertise

Qualifications

  • Lawyer, Supreme Court of NSW Lawyer
  • High Court of Australia

Insights

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Workplace & Employment

Casual vs Permanent

On 20 May 2020, the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia handed down its decision in WorkPac Pty Ltd v Rossato. The case centres around labour hire firm WorkPac, which employed Robert Rossato as a mine worker at two Queensland mines owned by Glencore. Mr Rossato was a casual employee, on rolling contracts, over a three-and-a-half-year period. As a casual, he was paid an extra 25 percent loading on top of his wage — which is the usual practice to make up for not being given benefits such as annual leave. The Full Federal Court dismissed WorkPac’s application for a declaration that Mr Rossato was a casual employee, instead finding that Mr Rossato was a permanent employee. It was found that because Mr Rossato's employment was "regular, certain, continuing, constant and predictable", and he was given rostered shifts well in advance, he was eligible to entitlements that full time employees receive under the National Employment Standards (NES) in the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) and the relevant Enterprise Agreement: being paid annual leave, paid personal/carer’s leave, paid compassionate leave, and payment for public holidays. This is an important decision for employers who engage casuals, whether directly or as a host employer. Pending any intervention by the Federal Government or appeal to the High Court, employers should now carefully review their casual employment arrangements, update the terms of their casual contracts, and revisit their arrangements with labour hire companies and their workers. In particular: • Employers should review their casual arrangements with a view to determining whether some other form of engagement is more appropriate – including part time and fixed term arrangements. • Assuming casual engagement is still appropriate, specific attention should be given to the employee’s written contract to ensure that the casual loading is a separately identifiable amount that is stated to be paid as a result of the employee not being entitled to NES or other entitlements peculiar to permanent employment. We also suggest a statement to the effect that if the employment is subsequently determined not to be casual employment, the employer is entitled to repayment of the casual loading. • Regular reviews of casual arrangements should be conducted – at least once every 12 months – to assess the likelihood of the employment being a “firm advance commitment” of employment. We can assist you if you have any questions about how the Workpac v Rossato decision may impact the work arrangements in your own organisation or more generally in relation to how you are employing or engaging your workforce.

24 Jun 2020


Firm News

Bringing the worlds of business together – H & H Lawyers

Thursday, 13 June 2019 – Rise of the boutique law firm Doing business with international partners – whether it be an entity operating on Australian soil or a local brand venturing offshore – can be fraught with difficulty. Between establishing a fresh customer base, navigating new laws, regulations and corporate governance, creating effective relationships and becoming nuanced with cultural mores (perhaps the trickiest of all), the business of doing business has the potential to bring an enterprise undone. For instance, exchanging a business card using one hand rather than two can be seen as a sign of disrespect in some cultures. Who would necessarily know? With Australians increasingly undertaking business across the world and with Asian powerhouses such as Japan, Korea and China, navigating the behind-the-scenes landscape, as well as providing direct services and advice, has become all important. Business owners and operators need to focus on what they do best, so employing people who specialise in troubleshooting make-or-break sensitive legal, technical and cultural matters is a vital and strategic move. Sydney’s H & H Lawyers offers this official and unofficial role in its capacity as a firm on the path to being Australia’s biggest ‘‘Asian’’ law firm. H & H Lawyers’ services include commercial and corporate advisory, acquisitions, dispute resolution, employment law, corporate migration and intellectual property. “Our bilingual lawyers have been inundated with work representing multinational corporations and government agencies from Japan, Korea and China that want to expand their businesses into Australia,” says Principal Ken Hong. “We have also been very busy acting for local clients with Japanese, Korean or Chinese backgrounds, or that have transactions with their counterparts in those three countries. “Demand for our services has escalated, so we are rapidly expanding to meet the demand.’’ Fellow Principal Yukio Hayashi says a vital aspect of the firm’s work includes “bridging fundamental cultural differences”. “This cross-cultural dexterity is not necessarily part of our brief, but it’s what we offer as well, as it is so essential,’’ he says. “Our team not only speaks the languages, but also intimately understands the cultural nuances of Asia. This saves our clients so much time in getting straight to the actual issues and resolutions. Without the right knowledge of culture, a lot of key messages can be lost in translation, particularly legal concepts, leading to a frustrating experience for all. “We had one situation recently in which there was an investment in an Australian business by a Japanese company. There were excellent managers and staff in situ, but the incoming management from Japan had their way of doing things that did not rest well with the Australian team, and vice versa.” “This friction was no one’s fault, but we made it our job to navigate the cultural minefield. We were able to get each side to see things from the other’s perspective and that made all the difference.” Hong and Hayashi say that by going this extra mile, the law firm can resolve difficulties and help international-facing businesses to thrive. “The importance of Australia’s trade relationships with Korea, China and Japan need no further explanation,’’ says Hong. “They are our top three trading partners. We look forward to continuing with our work and contributing to Australia’s successful trade relationships with those three countries.” Says Hayashi: “Our firm is well placed and equipped to help clients have a more fruitful, efficient and enjoyable experience in doing business.’’

13 Jun 2019


Firm News

H & H Lawyers welcomes Steven Hu and Tracy Huo

H & H Lawyers welcomes Steven Hu. Steven began his career as an associate to D.F Rofe QC at 12th Floor Wentworth Chambers in 2004 and was admitted to practice as a solicitor in 2007. He continued his career as a solicitor in a national firm prior joining Inmark Group, a property development and asset management company, where he worked as an associate director and legal counsel successfully managing a large scale, multi-award winning mix-use development in the Sydney CBD. Steven took on a senior executive position for a Chinese SOE in 2013, where he was responsible for overseeing and managing the day to day business for the entity in Shandong Province. Steven returned to Australia in 2017 to continue his legal profession with better and more in-depth understanding of the corporate culture and practical commercial experience in conducting cross border transactions. Steven’s multi-disciplinary experience will no doubt add value to his advice to Asian corporate clients operating in Australia. H & H Lawyers welcomes Tracy Huo. Tracy acquired Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws degrees in 2013 from the University of Sydney. Prior to joining H & H Lawyers, she worked in several law firms specializing in property law and she also worked for a fund management company in Sydney as a compliance officer. Her professional experiences in various fields will be a valuable addition to the firm.

30 Aug 2018